Snails
2013
Cast Bronze
Sizes vary: heights from 24"-29", widths & depths from 16"-50"

A series of six snail sculptures for a new neighborhood park in the Pearl District. These works are interactive–children may ride them–and playful, an eccentric take on denizens of our NW gardens, and what is a park if not a glorified garden?  My goal in this project was to create episodic moments of surprise with works of small scale–objects of simple form but with a small amount of intimate detail that an adult would bend down to look at and a child would find of familiar scale.  And of course, there is the matter of the snail’s pace: it is another reminder to slow down, to be in the present, to release the imagination–-reasons we go to parks.


Dust Devil
2011
Acrylic paint on aluminum
132” x 95” x 86” (11’x 8’x 7’)
McFarland Middle School, Othello, WA (WA State Art Collection)

 

The form and feeling is based on dust devils so common to this arid region of central Washington. The whirlwind's frenetic energy is meant to reflect the essence of a middle school (where it is located); its spiral form is a metaphor for momentum and growth.                                                           


Cairns (Cairn #1, #2, etc.)
2009
Stone
Sizes vary: heights from 11’ to 3’, widths & depths from 6’ to 3’
Downtown Light-Rail Corridor, Portland, OR

Inspired by the stacked stone cairns one finds marking trails all over the world, this series of 6 sculptural stone cairns mark the way between Portland’s Union Station and the two nearest light-rail stops.

Inspired by the stacked stone cairns one finds marking trails all over the world, this one of a series of 6 stone cairns marks the way between Portland's Union Station and the two nearest light-rail stops.


Listening Trumpets
2009
Rusted mild steel, stainless steel
Heights vary 62-72” x 22” x 32” 
Cooper Mountain Nature Park, Beaverton, OR

Three of these listening devices are sited throughout Cooper Mtn. Nature Park on the outskirts of Beaverton, OR to encourage visitors to listen to the sounds of this exquisite natural area.


Nest
2009
Rusted mild steel, stainless steel
4’6” x 7’ x 7’

 

The idea came from observing the nests of Western Gray Squirrels, which appear to be woven together with twigs, grasses, and other forest debris.  Though these squirrels do not nest on the ground, the intent was to create a shelter-like structure that children could enter and play in, while introducing them to the habits of some of the animals that inhabit Cooper Mountain.


 

Points of View
2008
Glass mosaic tile, stainless steel
33”x24”x24” (series of 12 boxes)

Valley Metro Rail, Phoenix/Tempe, Arizona (2003-’08), worked with architects, engineer and landscape architect in developing artwork for green trellis walls at light rail stations that takes into account extreme heat, light, shade and tight space limitations.  Community research for this project, wherein artists were encouraged to respond to the various demographic contexts of four different stations, involved interviewing community activists and researching historical records, including oral histories.

Works in trellis walls at light rail stations take into account heat, light, shade and tight space limitations.  Research for this project, where artists were encouraged to respond to diverse contexts of four different stations, involved interviewing community members and researching oral histories.

 

 

Circulations
2007
Stainless steel, granite, limestone, bronze
6'2" x 280' x 4'
Totem Lake Freeway Station, Kirkland, WA

 

A sequence of sculptures straddles the edge of a pedestrian walkway connecting a park-and-ride with a freeway transit station. Transportation relates to time, daily cycles and the arrivals and departures that connect us to the rest of the world. The series of 8 sculptures consisting of steel arches and elegant granite “wheels” is integrated with landscaping along the walkway, adding a sense of movement and lightness to the pedestrian experience.


The form, evocative of bud and flower shapes, provides an organic counterpoint to the site's formal geometry. The idea for the piece came from thoughts about the cyclical nature of growth and change, whether in nature or in the world of business.

Bloom Cycle
2005
Cast bronze
9’6” x 10’6” x 8’
Columbia Center lobby, Seattle, WA; deaccessioned 2015

Currently in King County Public Art Collection, King County, Washington  


Gathering In
1998
Granite, bronze
Installation area: 75’ long x 6’ wide; objects heights: 24-40”
Hatfield Gov’t Center Station, Westside MAX Light Rail, Hillsboro, Oregon

 

Based on a theme of Gathering-and-Dispersal, bronze basket forms are based on the shapes of indigenous gathering baskets; granite balls seem to be rolling in or out of the baskets, in playful reference to the daily comings and goings of all who use this light rail station.